A Culture of Asterisks

Stephen Kent makes a poignant point that extends well beyond the borders of Christianity:

The cross is the symbol of Christianity. The asterisk is the symbol of 21st Century conditional cultural Christianity. …
Marriages vows now seem to read
As long as you both shall live.*
*or until either party becomes bored, tired or attracted to another….

Disclaimers and exceptions proliferate, in these days, and it’s a simple matter to find ourselves slipping into them even when unnecessary or unjustified.

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Roland
Roland
11 years ago

I’ve always said this about being a Christian: if you don’t like the rules, don’t join the club.
I expect Catholics leaders to get involved in local issues and fight for the poor but that’s also an ‘*’ judgment call on Bishop Tobins behalf.
I don’t expect to follow his pets projects but when it comes to the Ten Commandments, yes, I do.
Want a religion with less rules? Become a pagan.

Warrington Faust
Warrington Faust
11 years ago

Although I frequently ask myself “What would Satan do?” I don’t think that there is more than a tangential connection with Christianity in these comments.
I think that “strict laibility” has more to do withour accepting the asterisk. Everything we buy with a warranty is cluttered with asterisks. Because if it is not mentioned, it is a source of possible liability. I recently bought a hand tool at Harbor Freight. It came with a 3 page manual. The first 2 pages were generic advise on the use of tools and possible injury. The theory of “strict liability”, not helpfulness, is the cause of this. The asterisk is simply about avoiding “run on” paragraphs.
In any case, we have just become accepting of asterisks and the idea that there is always something more to be said.

Warrington Faust
Warrington Faust
11 years ago

Although I frequently ask myself “What would Satan do?” I don’t think that there is more than a tangential connection with Christianity in these comments.
I think that “strict laibility” has more to do withour accepting the asterisk. Everything we buy with a warranty is cluttered with asterisks. Because if it is not mentioned, it is a source of possible liability. I recently bought a hand tool at Harbor Freight. It came with a 3 page manual. The first 2 pages were generic advise on the use of tools and possible injury. The theory of “strict liability”, not helpfulness, is the cause of this. The asterisk is simply about avoiding “run on” paragraphs.
In any case, we have just become accepting of asterisks and the idea that there is always something more to be said.

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