President’s Address to School Kids

As promised, the White House has released the prepared text of President Obama’s speech to school children today. Here’s the theme:

Now I’ve given a lot of speeches about education. And I’ve talked a lot about responsibility.
I’ve talked about your teachers’ responsibility for inspiring you, and pushing you to learn.
I’ve talked about your parents’ responsibility for making sure you stay on track, and get your homework done, and don’t spend every waking hour in front of the TV or with that Xbox.
I’ve talked a lot about your government’s responsibility for setting high standards, supporting teachers and principals, and turning around schools that aren’t working where students aren’t getting the opportunities they deserve.
But at the end of the day, we can have the most dedicated teachers, the most supportive parents, and the best schools in the world – and none of it will matter unless all of you fulfill your responsibilities. Unless you show up to those schools; pay attention to those teachers; listen to your parents, grandparents and other adults; and put in the hard work it takes to succeed.
And that’s what I want to focus on today: the responsibility each of you has for your education. I want to start with the responsibility you have to yourself.

More excerpts after the jump. Content wise, there are a few things here and there that I didn’t like (a reference to AIDS–the President needs to remember his audience, here). All in all, it’s OK, but it’s way too long for kids. After five minutes, the tune-out factor will be setting in. “When’s recess?”


Despite its length, there are some good parts. For instance:

I know that sometimes, you get the sense from TV that you can be rich and successful without any hard work — that your ticket to success is through rapping or basketball or being a reality TV star, when chances are, you’re not going to be any of those things.
But the truth is, being successful is hard. You won’t love every subject you study. You won’t click with every teacher. Not every homework assignment will seem completely relevant to your life right this minute. And you won’t necessarily succeed at everything the first time you try.
That’s OK. Some of the most successful people in the world are the ones who’ve had the most failures. JK Rowling’s first Harry Potter book was rejected twelve times before it was finally published. Michael Jordan was cut from his high school basketball team, and he lost hundreds of games and missed thousands of shots during his career. But he once said, “I have failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed.”
These people succeeded because they understand that you can’t let your failures define you – you have to let them teach you. You have to let them show you what to do differently next time. If you get in trouble, that doesn’t mean you’re a troublemaker, it means you need to try harder to behave. If you get a bad grade, that doesn’t mean you’re stupid, it just means you need to spend more time studying.
No one’s born being good at things, you become good at things through hard work. You’re not a varsity athlete the first time you play a new sport. You don’t hit every note the first time you sing a song. You’ve got to practice. It’s the same with your schoolwork. You might have to do a math problem a few times before you get it right, or read something a few times before you understand it, or do a few drafts of a paper before it’s good enough to hand in.

He ended with some inspiration:

And even when you’re struggling, even when you’re discouraged, and you feel like other people have given up on you – don’t ever give up on yourself. Because when you give up on yourself, you give up on your country.
The story of America isn’t about people who quit when things got tough. It’s about people who kept going, who tried harder, who loved their country too much to do anything less than their best.
It’s the story of students who sat where you sit 250 years ago, and went on to wage a revolution and found this nation. Students who sat where you sit 75 years ago who overcame a Depression and won a world war; who fought for civil rights and put a man on the moon. Students who sat where you sit 20 years ago who founded Google, Twitter and Facebook and changed the way we communicate with each other.
So today, I want to ask you, what’s your contribution going to be? What problems are you going to solve? What discoveries will you make? What will a president who comes here in twenty or fifty or one hundred years say about what all of you did for this country?

It’s too bad that these excerpts weren’t the entire extent of the speech. By the time he gets to these parts, he will have probably lost a lot of ’em.

0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
4 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
BobN
BobN
11 years ago

A bad speech. Not as propagandistic or manipulative as I’m sure the first draft was, but so completely self-absorbed and simultaneously shallow that no kid could believe it.
Speaking of not believing, I think that story about 4:30am lessons from his mom in Indonesia is a complete lie. Conveniently, no one is alive except BHO to corroborate the story.
He has been known to fabulize his history. Dan Armstrong, a former colleague of mine and earlier a colleague of BHO at Business International, publicly exposed BHO’s description of his job there as a complete lie during the campaign last year.

OldTimeLefty
11 years ago

BobN
Please cite specifics of Dan Armstrong’s “exposure” of Obama’s job description at Business International.
OldTimeLefty

BobN
BobN
11 years ago

Start here:
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/30/us/politics/30obama.html
Google +”dan armstrong” +obama for many more articles.
You’re welcome.

BobN
BobN
11 years ago

So Lefty, did you check the link? Have you nothing more to say?

Show your support for Anchor Rising with a 25-cent-per-day subscription.