Mischief on the Hill

This is not encouraging:

[Rhode Island’s] Legislative leaders have scheduled hearings or floor votes for 196 individual proposals between Tuesday afternoon and Thursday night. And that number is expected to grow. …
The scope of the agenda apparently surprised several political observers.
“I thought it was going to be more targeted,” said John Marion, executive director of the government watchdog group Common Cause. “It seems like they’re going to try to finish the bulk of what was left on the table the morning of June 27.” …
Legislative leaders have suspended the rules, which normally require 48-hour notice of all committee and floor action. That means committee hearings can now be held with a few minutes notice in unusual places, such as State House balconies and hallways, just as has happened in the final days of recent Assembly sessions.

No explanation has been given for the sense of urgency, strongly suggesting a desire to exchange political capital (whatever the effects on the state) while Rhode Islanders are distracted by an activity-rich holiday (parties, trick-or-treating, scary movie marathons, etc.). The possible allusions for a quick strike done in the autumn shadows are too plentiful to require my choice of one; readers should pick their own favorite.
The governor should prepare to wield his veto pen like a glowing holy artifact.

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Pragmatist
Pragmatist
11 years ago

Urgency? What urgency? The overwhelming majority of these bills were debated earlier in the year, some for many months (and some even for several years), and were passed by one chamber. Do you really think we need to debate the anti-prostitution bill further?
A “quick strike in the autumn shadows”? I suppose that would be true if a cabal of unelected conspirators hijacked state government in the dead of night. But since the elected representatives of the people are publicly debating and publicly voting on issues that have already been widely debated, reported, and voted on … what was your argument again Justin?
Oh yeah, General Assembly = BAD. You really could shorten your posts considerably.

Ragin' Rhode Islander
Ragin' Rhode Islander
11 years ago

From the ProJo story: “Legislative leaders have suspended the rules, which normally require 48-hour notice of all committee and floor action. That means committee hearings can now be held with a few minutes notice in unusual places, such as State House balconies and hallways, just as has happened in the final days of recent Assembly sessions.”
Obviously if the ban indoor prostitution there’ll be an exception for Smith Hill, for the Democrat whores will continue to ply their trade, answering to the poverty pimps and engaging in conjugal activities with unions.
This whole thing smells like Rhode Island’s bush-league imitation of the Democrats in Congress and their “stimulus” bill.

Monique
Editor
11 years ago

“The governor should prepare to wield his veto pen like a glowing holy artifact.”
Yes, for reasons of both principle and pragmatism. Principle, because many of those bills should not become law and vetoing them will be the right thing to do. Pragmatically, because at least it will delay by several months (i.e., until the next G.A. session) the bad, veto-proof ones actually becoming law.

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