Open Thread: Is there a Big Idea in Modern Political Philsophy that’s Not Somewhere in the Work of John Locke, Edmund Burke, or Jean-Jacques Rousseau?

I can’t think of a body for this post that makes clearer what’s in the title.

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Monique
Editor
9 years ago

“I can’t think of a body for this post that makes clearer what’s in the title.”
lol

jparis
jparis
9 years ago

Not traditionally thought of as a philosopher, but the natural consequences of Joseph Schumpeter’s work?
Creative Destruction in technological innovation and the need for broader freedoms in intellectual property law to allow for the full flourishing of an innovative society?
The need for assisting (retraining, retooling) losers in a market environment, so as to stabilize the whole ecosystem? Maybe that part is easily derivative. But the rest?

Warrington Faust
Warrington Faust
9 years ago

No, I don’t think so. All a philosopher really needs to know is human nature. I regard that as a constant. For those who would say “this is a different era” I suggest that is only a term for “change”. I think human responses to change are well known. What that particular change might be is not significant.

Edward Brynes
Edward Brynes
9 years ago

Unfortunately, John Rawls.

Edward Brynes
Edward Brynes
9 years ago

I was thinking of the second of Rawls’ two principles of justice: “Social and economic inequalities are to be arranged so that they are both: (a) to the advantage of the least advantaged, consistent with the just saving principle, and …” The requirement (a) seems to me non-traditional. It requires very extensive government intervention in the economy.

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