Time to Hunker Down for a Perennial Winter

How oppressive it will be depends on whether the Senate falls, as well. Regardless, and speaking with some restraint, the next two years (at least) promise to be difficult and perhaps dangerous.
Who can doubt, for instance, that the regime in Iran and terrorists across the globe feel as if they, themselves, have won a victory in their war against the United States? A nuclear Iran may or may not be a fait accompli, but it is certainly less likely that the country will now increase its openness to negotiations or that the United States will take the decisive steps necessary to stop it nonetheless. Similarly, expect a resurgence of violence in Iraq and perhaps, if the terrorists continue their characteristic fatally over-anxious strategizing, in the United States.
Meanwhile, Larry Kudlow makes me relieved that I currently work in two very different segments of the economy. The strength of the economy that we’ve enjoyed despite a major terrorist attack on our financial center, a war in progress, and environmental calamity may be about to wane.
On social and moral issues, from marriage to stem cells, I expect those on my side will have a lot of persuading and arguing to do. In a silver lining way, that will help us to focus our understanding of the world and to hone our vision for the future, hopefully laying the foundation for a return to prior trends in our direction. In a dark cloud way, I’m relieved that recent improvements of the Supreme Court cannot be undone and can only hope that the president is prepared to begin using his veto power.
I don’t think the media is correct that this election’s results are entirely attributable to, in soon-to-be-ex Senator Chafee’s words, “rage toward our president.” The Democrats, the media, and liberals generally have striven, out of their own black feelings, to make hatred out of broad disappointment. Republican partisans must heed Representative John Boehner’s analysis that the “American people strongly supported our ideas and agenda in 1994, and they still do.” Americans wanted change, yes, but the tragedy of our political system’s current makeup is that the only change available was in the wrong direction. Republicans tried to capitalize on that fact for their own gain, and that left them vulnerable.
But none of this is an expression of buyer’s remorse from a rebellious conservative. A trip around the dark side of the moon is what we need — a sort of (to mix metaphors) aggressive radiation therapy. I will pray strenuously, though, that my aforementioned restraint in prognostication is proven wise, and not unduly, well, conservative.

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Harry
Harry
14 years ago

Thanks to all here who abandoned Chafee and gave us the decisive vote in the Senate. Great job!

Tom W
Tom W
14 years ago

>>Thanks to all here who abandoned Chafee and gave us the decisive vote in the Senate. Great job
Chafee first not only abandoned us, he took obvious delight at sticking his liberal thumb in our eye.
Democrats can gloat now.
But in the end, they’ll advance their agenda. The economy will suffer greatly. Al Quada, Iran and North Koprea will be emboldened and resurgent in the face of Democrat appeasement. And Americans will again realize how misguided are the Democrats’ policies and worldview.
It took Jimmy Carter and the Iranian hostages to pave the way for Ronald Reagan.
Democrats, be careful what you wish for!

Will
Will
14 years ago

“It took Jimmy Carter and the Iranian hostages to pave the way for Ronald Reagan.”
Tom, a most excellent analogy.

mrh
mrh
14 years ago

Who can doubt, for instance, that the regime in Iran and terrorists across the globe feel as if they, themselves, have won a victory in their war against the United States?
(Raises hand.)

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