Another Argument for In-Store Health Clinics

In an op-ed in today’s Projo about CVS’ proposed network of in-store health clinics, Joann Fitzpatrick (a retired editor for the Quincy Patriot Ledger) argues that much of what appears to be a healthcare “crisis” is really the result of an inflexible system that poorly aligns available resources with people’s needs…

Our confusing, overpriced health-care system needs a lot of changes and high on the list is flexibility. That means flexibility in the attitude of health-care providers — including medical professionals and insurers — and in the delivery of health care. Too often patients must negotiate a labyrinth of rules and requirements just to see a doctor for a simple ailment….
[CVS MinuteClinics] answer the needs of working families and of those who don’t necessarily have a primary-care physician, or insurance. For a parent, taking a child with a sore throat or cough to a clinic rather than a busy pediatrician’s office can mean the difference between being an hour late for work or missing half a day. For a twenty-something without a personal physician, having a rash looked at and treated for $59 is the cost of a few drinks at a downtown bar….
Consumers need to become their own advocates for good health care. We can’t expect everyone to navigate insurance rules and increasingly complex modern medicine with ease. But consumers should be seeking value for their health-care dollar as much as they do with grocery bills.

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Sean OD
Sean OD
13 years ago

Competition… Convenience… Increased productive efficiency and cost effectiveness by using RNP’s and PA’s.
In-store health clinics; IF NOT OVER-REGULATED, can play a role in reducing the cost of healthcare.

Greg
Greg
13 years ago

Shopping for my health care just like I shop for my…. eye care?!
That couldn’t possibly work.

warren
warren
13 years ago

Look at a rash for $59. ????
I thought this concept was good when I first heard about it. At these prices it seems like it is playing out just about as greedily as the current system.
For shame!

warren
warren
13 years ago

Look at a rash for $59. ????
I thought this concept was good when I first heard about it. At these prices it seems like it is playing out just about as greedily as the current system.
For shame!

Andrew
13 years ago

Warren,
How much would you pay at an emergency room for the same service?
Or do you equate paying through a 3rd party to receiving treatment for “free”, and therefore think the question not relevant?
(Also, you should be aware that one of the main objections to MinuteClinics comes from medical providers who say that easy-access clinics will make it difficult for them to subsidize other part of their practice by charging higher rates for simple procedures. That’s not an encouraging sign that people are getting a good deal from the existing system.)

Michael
13 years ago

I took my daughter to the ER last month on a Sunday. She had a rash. The ER copay was $100.00. prescription co-pay $25.00. No idea how much my insurance company was charged. Two hour wait. I’ll take the Minute Clinic.

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