A Coalition of One

On what grounds are the first two groups included on this list:

Health care workers, small-business owners and unions are especially concerned about that prospect. A new group, the Coalition for Our Communities, has raised $1.3 million, about $1 million of that from national teachers’ unions, and plans television advertisements and direct mail campaigns against the repeal.
Karen White, director of campaigns and elections for the National Education Association, which has given $750,000, said the “reckless proposal” would have “dire consequences that will put education at risk, health care at risk, public safety at risk.”
She added: “We’re prepared to commit more money if we need to. We’re going to do what we need to do to make sure that we win this one.”

Coughing up a million bucks (77% of the financing for the “coalition”) is certainly evidence of especial concern, but what have health care workers and small-business owners done? Particularly for the latter group, I imagine the explanation would require that one consider a subset of “small-business owners” to be decisive.
The whole thing does make me wonder, though, whether a coordinated state-by-state effort to end state income taxes mightn’t bankrupt the teachers’ unions as they attempted to protect their heard of cash cows.

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Ragin' Rhode Islander
Ragin' Rhode Islander
12 years ago

“Health care workers” = folks who make their living off of welfare programs like Medicare & Medicaid.
“Small business owners” = welfare daycare workers and other members of the poverty industry.
Did anyone else notice the Hispanic activist opinion piece in last week’s ProJo and the mention of women-owned Hispanic businesses being the fasted growing segment of business start-ups in the country (or something like that)?
Did that strike anyone else as odd?
The only possible explanation is the national phenomenon of welfare daycare “businesses” being run out of homes. Rhode Island isn’t the only place with this welfare in disguise aspect of the poverty industry going on.
Encourage women to pump out bastard children, then get the taxpayers to pay them to run “independent businesses” to provide their daycare while the women engage in “welfare to work.”
You’ve gotta hand it to the poverty pimps – they’re great at perpetuating themselves by creating problems and then creating “programs” to “respond” to the problems!

Mike
Mike
12 years ago

The only possible explanation is the national phenomenon of welfare daycare “businesses” being run out of homes. Rhode Island isn’t the only place with this welfare in disguise aspect of the poverty industry going on.
Encourage women to pump out bastard children, then get the taxpayers to pay them to run “independent businesses” to provide their daycare while the women engage in “welfare to work.”
You’ve gotta hand it to the poverty pimps – they’re great at perpetuating themselves by creating problems and then creating “programs” to “respond” to the problems!”
Here’s how Clinton “ended welfare as we know it”:
1. Put everybody and their kids on SSI and free medical and babystting and food stamps and housing.
2. Mandate paying out billions to new babysitters and give THEM free medical too.
In short-a farce and a parody.

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