Bill Ayers tries to airbrush his personal history

Bill Ayers tries to rewrite his personal life history in this New York Times editorial.
J. G. Thayer doesn’t let him get away with airbrushing history:

…The facts are simple: Ayers — by his own admission; he described himself after his trial as “guilty as hell; free as a bird” — should have been sent to prison. Instead, he is not only free, but an honored professor who specializes in teaching future teachers — working to make certain his toxic ideology and principles are passed on to more and more young people.William Ayers is not a victim. He is not a misunderstood hero. He is not someone who, despite his protestations to the contrary, deeply regrets the folly of his youth. He is not someone who is repentant of his past misdeeds. He is a would-be Timothy McVeigh, but with more degrees and less technical competence.

ADDENDUM
More on Bill Ayers. Yep, just another law-abiding citizen.

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Monique
Editor
12 years ago

Wow. Ayers revisionism is beautiful. It amounts to: “evil things were being done so we were justified in committing evil ourselves”. And, in fact: “they should not commit evil but we can”.

vera
vera
12 years ago

He doesnt seem to have any real benefits for writing that column. I believe that since he admits that he was to help encourage links and thoughts about terrorism to Obama and he insteaded decided that is was useless due to having a candidate that is of a real nature and that the typical desparate tactics to soil his name further werent working in this very distinctive case, many members of the Right will obviously respond in the way this web page just did. I would have expected some members of the Right to respond in the way you here, but I am not here to criticize this website especially since I’m sure you guys know alot more than me in regards to politics and current events. Just wanted to make a comment.
Thanks

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