Pushing It as Only Rhode Island Can

The latest news on the business sales tax front — which isn’t online, because Projo.com is still down — is that Liberty Elm diner has come up with the $5,000 needed to prevent closure, while the Carcieri administration will begin notifying local police about which businesses to keep closed sometime next week. As I suggested yesterday, discussion of this matter must begin with the acknowledgment that businesses collected the sales tax money and then, apparently, spent it. That said, this is more than a bit heavy-handed:

For the Liberty Elm, the reprieve will be short. The diner must pay another $5,000 by the end of August before the state will allow it to establish a monthly payment plan.

Granted that the state has a right to that money, but the impression begins to be of an extortionist with his thumb on a “client,” especially in light of anecdotes such as the following email that I received this morning:

One of your points need a little clarification: “businesses find it necessary to help themselves to free loans from the state.” Its worth pointing out that the state charges a hefty 18 percent interest rate and late fee on delinquent payments. Hardly giving them an advantage over other businesses that pay on time. In fact the debt that piles up on late payments is in many ways more holes in a leaky boat.
I was in the same situation with my business in November. (You have to be paid in full by December for license renewal and again by July for your sales tax permit.) Business started to fall off. I went through my savings and then maxed out my credit cards to try and keep things going. I managed to come up with the tax money that was owed but was short on the interest and penalty. The business was employing people, making money, and I would have been able to have everything paid in about 3 months. The state refused a payment plan. I was looking at being unemployed, broke, and seeing a business that I gave 11 years to go away. I had to bring them to court and get a court order for a payment plan. Got that news 3 days before the deadline.
So I one-hundred-percent agree with you that the state should make payment plans with these businesses. In an ideal world maybe even lower the interest rates.
The way the system works now, a business that employs people, pays vendors, and does not leech off the welfare system could be closed for hitting a rough patch. But I can’t complain; after all, the state pays all their bills exactly when they are due.

It certainly fits the image of this state to squeeze those who are trying to be productive while coddling those who demand handouts.

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johhny g
johhny g
11 years ago

Payment plans, better communications, whatever at the end of the day taxes other people have paid are still owed.
Here’s something novel that would keep people out of trouble. How about an electronic funds transfer plan, so you could transfer the money out the state daily or weekly.
If the temptation were removed than less people would be apt use consumers’ sales tax dollars.

johhny g
johhny g
11 years ago

Damn spell check. I meant ot the state. Hey we got enough money going out of state !Payment plans, better communications, whatever at the end of the day taxes other people have paid are still owed.
Here’s something novel that would keep people out of trouble. How about an electronic funds transfer plan, so you could transfer the money to the state daily or weekly.
If the temptation were removed than less people would be apt use consumers’ sales tax dollars.

David
David
11 years ago

Seems to me that if I go to a restaurant and purchase a dinner, I know I am also paying the state. I expect the establishment to know this and to send that portion along. I would think each day’s receipts would be treated that way. What am I missing? AR people go on and on about law and order issues like illegal immigration. The argument is basically – the law is the law is the law. How is the sales tax – given your argument- different?

Nancy Green
11 years ago

Justin, I don’t expect to be on the same side of the fence with you as a routine thing, but you are right about small businesses. When I visit my in-laws in Louisville, Ky, I see the same little storefronts keeping on.
Back in RI, I’ve seen many good people start a store or restaurant and fail.
But capitalism and free enterprise are not the same thing. Burger Thing has lots of politicians in its pocket, Miss Fannie’s served better food but was undercapitalized. And someone broke one of their windows. It’s a Sinclair Lewis Jungle out there for regular people.
That’s why I support the Liberty. They and other small businesses are re-vitalizing South Prov.

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