Education

RE: Why Teachers’ Unions (Not Teachers!) Are Bad For Education

By | January 26, 2005 |

Marc’s posting highlights another outstanding piece by Terry Moe. I would encourage you to read both Marc’s fine posting and the entire editorial by Moe, which you can access in Marc’s posting. As a former East Greenwich School Committee member, I would like to expand on several of Marc’s points: First, I agree that parents…

Why Teacher’s Unions (Not Teachers!) Are Bad for Education

By Marc Comtois | January 26, 2005 |

Terry Moe of the Hoover Institution and a Stanford University political-science professor (and winner of the Thomas B. Fordham prize for distinguished scholarship in education) has written an important piece explaining the motivation of Teachers’ Unions. The most important point is that the unions aren’t inherently “bad,” but that they are merely looking out for…

Rhode Island Politics & Taxation, Part IV

By | January 24, 2005 |

This posting continues a periodic series on Rhode Island politics and taxation, building on three previous postings (I, II, III). My town of East Greenwich has an increasingly ugly dispute between School Committee officials and teachers’ union officials. The dispute has been highlighted in local newspaper articles (here, here, here, here, here). Comments by National…

Politics of Charter Schools III

By Marc Comtois | January 20, 2005 |

According to State Education Commissioner Peter McWalters, much of the debate on charter schools centers around the issues of power and control. Specifically, this battle revolves around which entity, public schools or charter schools, has more of a “right” to money from a finite pool of education dollars. As reported by the Providence Journal, charter…

Labels as a First Step Toward Finding Deeper Meaning

By | January 18, 2005 |

I received the December 2004 issue of The Proposition, a publication of the Claremont Institute. As a graduate of Harvey Mudd College, one of the Claremont Colleges, who also satisfied the requirements for a political science major at Claremont McKenna College, I found one of the quotes in the issue to be an interesting perspective…

The Politics of Charter Schools: Addendum

By Marc Comtois | January 12, 2005 |

Confirming my thoughts from an earlier post, Jennifer Marshall and Kirk Johnson have put up a piece over at National Review Online that explains how to interpret the often conflicting Charter School data that has recently been released. In my original post, I compared the data and found that the research (PDF) of Caroline Hoxby,…

RE: Where is the Moral Outrage

By Marc Comtois | January 12, 2005 | Comments Off on RE: Where is the Moral Outrage

To continue building on previous posts (here, here, here and my post yesterday), it seems that progress is being made on one front in the battle for academic freedom. As I have previously mentioned, some Columbia students were outraged when confronted by blatantly anti-Israel rhetoric in the classroom. Thanks to the David Project and the…

Where is the Moral Outrage…Again?

By | December 28, 2004 |

I previously posted a piece entitled Where is the Moral Outrage? which documented both the political harassment of American college students by left-wing professors and the hiring by Hamilton College of an instructor who was an unapologetic alumna of the Weather Underground terrorist group. Yesterday’s mail brought the January 2005 issue of Commentary magazine to…

Relevancy of the Humanities and Questions Unasked

By Marc Comtois | December 15, 2004 | Comments Off on Relevancy of the Humanities and Questions Unasked

In the course of yet another article about bias in our univerisities, William Pilger (a pseudonym), a conservative tenured professor in a southern university, managed to both display the value of a humanities education and the reluctance (and reason) that students show for engaging in any type of classroom discussion that may touch on current…

RE:Where is the Moral Outrage

By Marc Comtois | December 9, 2004 |

I became more interested in bias in academia when I re-entered “the academy” to pursue an MA in History (at Providence College). Thankfully, I have not personally felt any real “quashing of dissent.” Although I have heard a few pithy political asides in the course of unrelated lectures, my experience at Providence College has been…

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