Pardon Jim Taricani?

Wilson vs. Taricani

By Carroll Andrew Morse | December 10, 2004 |

For us separation-of-powers enthusiasts, there is an important distinction between the Plame-Wilson case and the Taricani case. In the Plame-Wilson affair, journalists are being asked to tell what they know about the violation of an actual law. It is illegal — according to a law passed by Congress, signed by the President — to leak…

Threading the Needle of Rights and Hauteur

By Justin Katz | December 9, 2004 | Comments Off on Threading the Needle of Rights and Hauteur

As the Providence Journal editorial board recently put it, when it comes to the Taricani affair, “there are no heroes here.” Perhaps this is a glass-half-empty assessment, but the entire controversy has a feel more of competing negative claims than of balancing strong arguments. Writing of the significantly different, but inherently related, Plame affair, Jonah…

Taricani: 6 Months Home Confinement

By Carroll Andrew Morse | December 9, 2004 | Comments Off on Taricani: 6 Months Home Confinement

You’ve probably heard it elsewhere by now, but Jim Taricani has been sentenced to six months of home confinement.

Taricani’s Right to Trial-By-Jury

By Carroll Andrew Morse | December 6, 2004 | Comments Off on Taricani’s Right to Trial-By-Jury

I was surprised to read in Sunday’s Projo that the Taricani case continues. There is still a fundamental question I have yet to see answered anywhere in public. Did Taricani waive his right to a jury trial in this case? If so, why? If not, how has Judge Torres’ managed to skirt the whole right-to-trial-by-jury…

An Obvious Plan?

By Justin Katz | December 2, 2004 | Comments Off on An Obvious Plan?

I only caught a few minutes of his radio show while I rushed around, but Dan Yorke seems to think it’s obvious that Jim Taricani tried to give Bevilacqua up in his “by chance” meeting with FBI agent Dennis Aiken… without actually giving him up. If that’s the case, I agree with Yorke that Taricani’s…

Freedom of the Press: To Whom Does it Extend?

By Marc Comtois | December 2, 2004 | Comments Off on Freedom of the Press: To Whom Does it Extend?

Eugene Volokh, a blogger himself, has a piece in today’s New York Times in which he mentions the Taricani case. However, of more importance is the larger question he seeks to address Because of the Internet, anyone can be a journalist. Some so-called Weblogs – Internet-based opinion columns published by ordinary people – have hundreds…

Shifting Objectives (?)

By Justin Katz | December 1, 2004 | Comments Off on Shifting Objectives (?)

Frankly, I just don’t know what to make of this: … special prosecutor Marc DeSisto says in court papers filed this morning that Bevilacqua never asked Taricani to keep his identity confidential and that the defense lawyer urged the reporter more than 2 1/2 years ago to tell DeSisto that he was his source. ……

Facing the Judges

By Justin Katz | November 22, 2004 | Comments Off on Facing the Judges

A word on where Andrew and I differ most significantly on the Taricani matter: Andrew believes that one problem that conservatives face when attempting to trim the powers of the judiciary is that they “pick a hot-button issue — gay marriage, flag burning, ‘under god’ in the pledge of allegiance — to advance the cause…

Help me with a Taricani Detail

By Carroll Andrew Morse | November 20, 2004 | Comments Off on Help me with a Taricani Detail

I have question about a “detail” in the Jim Taricani case that I have yet to see explained. Perhaps one of my fellow contributors or one of Anchor Rising’s readers can help me with this… Did Taricani voluntarily waive his right to a trial-by-jury in this matter, and if so, why?

Reason 4 to Pardon Jim Taricani: Hard Cases Make Bad Law

By Carroll Andrew Morse | November 19, 2004 |

There is a legal maxim that says “hard cases make bad law”. This has taken on a new urgency with respect to the Jim Taricani case. As a result of Judge Torres’ Thursday ruling, Senator Christopher Dodd from Connecticut has proposed a federal shield law for journalists. Let me make an important point I haven’t…

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