Rhode Island History

Open Thread: Ballot Question 1

By Carroll Andrew Morse | October 24, 2010 |

The floor (aka the comments section) is open, for people who’d like to discuss why they will or will not be voting for or against the first question that will appear on the Nov. 2 Rhode Island ballot…AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE (CHANGING THE OFFICIAL NAME OF THE STATE) Approval of the amendment…

Under Sgouros’s Tapestry

By Justin Katz | August 7, 2010 |

I recently managed to work my to-read pile of books down to Rhode Island 101, and I’ll have more to say about it when I manage to work my to-write pile down that far. For the moment, though, it’s relevant to note that the two commentary boxes offered in the “Economy” chapter are provided by…

Leadership Is Also About Timing

By Justin Katz | July 16, 2009 |

Ah, Frank: Breaking new ground in Rhode Island’s top political ranks, General Treasurer Frank T. Caprio has made public his daily calendars for the last 18 months, a move that not only shows how and with whom he has spent his time in office, but also the number of days he spent traveling outside Rhode…

Plantation Fight: The Veiled Threats Begin

By Marc Comtois | July 6, 2009 |

According to Senator Harold Metts, the people of Rhode Island had better drop their ‘Plantations’ or they’ll be viewed as racists by the rest of the country. Metts, as reported by the Providence Business News, raised the specter of economic retribution should voters reject the removal of “Providence Plantations” from the official name of the…

Anti-‘Plantations’ Campaign Ramping Up

By Marc Comtois | July 2, 2009 |

Still talking about ‘Plantations’: Supporters of a plan that would give voters in next year’s general election the opportunity to strike the phrase “and Providence Plantations” from the state’s formal name, launched a public awareness and education campaign Wednesday….Backers say there is much work to be done if they are to persuade Rhode Island voters…

The Mire We’re In

By Justin Katz | March 17, 2008 |

If you haven’t already read it, the final installment of Kenneth Payne’s review of how Rhode Island reached its current state of political mire. One key thing to remember, as wrangling over budgets and state government action continues: The General Assembly’s powers are plenary and unlimited, except as those powers are restricted by the U.S.…

Evolving Corruption

By Justin Katz | February 24, 2008 |

Part 2 of Kenneth Payne’s series on the evolution of political corruption in Rhode Island is worth a read (emphasis added): The forms of government were familiar. For those in control, the system worked. The Yankee establishment held the reins of power. The State House was an expression of that power — political and economic.…

Reopening the Dorr

By Justin Katz | February 19, 2008 |

I’m disappointed to see that the Providence Journal is apparently not printing Kenneth Payne’s series on Rhode Island’s political history online. It’s worth a look, if you’ve access to Sunday’s paper. This paragraph, in particular, caught my attention: Rhode Island government in 1900 was still colored by the dark shadows of the Dorr War, the…

Anachronistic History: Ruth Simmons on George Washington

By Marc Comtois | August 22, 2007 |

In a ProJo story about the annual reading of George Washington’s Letter to the Touro Synagogue in Newport, Brown University President Ruth Simmons is quoted thusly: She touched upon the moral contradictions underlying the noble desires of past leaders who were eager to uphold freedom, despite an indifference to the injustice of slavery. “We all…

A Firsthand Report on the President’s Visit

By Carroll Andrew Morse | June 28, 2007 |

Will Ricci, East Providence Republican City Committee Treasurer, National Federation of Republican Assemblies Regional Vice-President, and most importantly, frequent Anchor Rising commenter was able to attend today’s Presidential visit to the Naval War College in Newport. Will sends along his impressions, observations, and a photograph from the event… Will Ricci: I had the opportunity to…

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