Playing the “Shove It” Card

Reporting on Democrat gubernatorial candidate Frank Caprio’s multiple statements that President Obama can “take his endorsement and shove it,” WPRI blogger Ted Nesi has broken new RI blogger ground by receiving a Drudge link. Personally, I find the whole thing predictable and too well staged.
Anybody who’s been reading Anchor Rising — and who understands that Caprio isn’t one for intemperate spontaneity — should see this as a calculated move to shore up the right-of-center voters whom Caprio courted thoroughly and effectively right up to the Democrat primary. If he can “shove” Obama into the Linc Chafee camp, moderates and Republicans who like the Chafee name but don’t realize what his positions entail will reconsider. That could break the odd coalition of far-left progressives and old-guard Republicans, with Caprio positioned to reap the rewards, rather than Republican John Robitaille.
He just has to hope that he can persuade his moderate and establishment Democrat voters that he’s not signaling a rejection of partisan ideals, and the recent Bill Clinton visit surely provided plenty of cover in that regard.
That’s why the politics of this election are dull even where they attract national attention: The candidates are playing checkers, not chess.

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michael
michael
10 years ago

He fell right in with the John Dipietro crowd, pretty low for a candidate for governor. I agree that it was a calculated move, one that shows remarkable disdain for the Rhode Island voter.

Patrick
Patrick
10 years ago

How much of the President’s “behavior” is because Caprio supported Hillary for president? If that is the case, then why would anyone with aspirations of higher office ever publicly take sides before the primaries are over?

mangeek
mangeek
10 years ago

Or he could just come off as crass. I filed papers this time, but felt that I needed more polish and experience before I considered myself truly viable, and even I would never say such a thing, to Bush or Obama.

Swazool
Swazool
10 years ago

Get ready to be saying Governor Chafee. I have not seen one person have a favorable reaction to Caprio saying shove it or that we are an atm, he embarrassed the entire state, democrats, republicans, and independents.

joe bernstein
joe bernstein
10 years ago

Caprio was out of line to say that publicly.He is running to be chief executive of the state,not writing a blog or hosting talk radio,where that kind of stuff is routine.
The Clintons and Obama are gearing up for a bloodletting in 2012 and Caprio is just some collateral damage.
This reminds me of Kennedy going after Carter 1n 1980.Only Hillary isn’t likely to get drunk and drive off a bridge.
Caprio picked sides with the Clintons,so what does he expect?
Anyhow,Chafee supported Obama from the jump,so Obama was showing some respect for the support without coming right out for Chafee.
I don’t care anyway-I’m going for Robitaille after muh thought.

Sammy
Sammy
10 years ago

[Deleted for slanderous lies about Anchor Rising. This is Sammy’s one warning.— JK]

brassband
brassband
10 years ago

Joe —
I’d love to hear your case for Robitaille, I’m genuinely undecided in this race, one week out.

Monique
Editor
10 years ago

There are some who are saying that this was spontaneous by Caprio. I agree with Justin and Michael; this was deliberate and manipulative. Further, it was carried out only after it was clear that Caprio was not going to receive President Obama’s endorsement.
At one point this morning, there was a headline in the ProJo refering to “Candidate Frank Caprio” making this crude, disrespectful remark. Wrong.
Carcieri/Roberts/Mollis/Caprio/Lynch do not stop being general officers of the state in their utterances or their behavior. Further, candidates are usually advised to conduct themselves on the campaign trail as though they had already achieved the office they seek.
With this comment, Frank Caprio notably failed both of these standards. In the process, as caller Steve told Matt Allen last night, Rhode Island once again made national headlines for all the wrong reasons.

Tommy Cranston
Tommy Cranston
10 years ago

Poor Lil Frankie-he’s lost the Right, he’s lost the Left, he’s lost the public unions-now he’s lost the remaining Yes We Can zombies.
All he has left is the straight ticket voters and people his corrupt daddy has gotten no show jobs for. 3rd place is the END of his career.
Oh, and Justin-PLEASE get rid of this sewer scum troll Sammy (formerly Stuart)—permanently.

hellas
hellas
10 years ago

Caprio watched the deification of Juan Williams on cable news and talk radio last week, and decided he wanted a piece of the action.
He pretty much burned his bridges with the R.I. Democratic Party, because it wasn’t just Obama he slapped in the face. When you accept a party endorsement, you’re obligated to be part of the team (why Bob Walsh left the state committee). Frank already proved he wasn’t a team player when he refused to endorse Liz Roberts. He should’ve gone indie like Chafee did.

BobN
BobN
10 years ago

Using Hellas’s logic, when you’re the national head of a party by virtue of being the President, you have an obligation to support the team, meaning the party-endorsed candidates for state office. Caprio acted crudely, but Obama acted “stupidly”.

George
George
10 years ago

Chafee has even less class. First, publicly bragging you didnt’ vote for your own party’s incumbent president was low enough.
But then to dump and bad-mouth the Republican Party after all the cash they infused into his Senate campaign.
And then, to announce support for Obama, the day John McCain comes to RI; after McCain had made many stops in RI to support Chafee. Totally class-less.
I don’t like Caprio, but I believe his frustration was warranted and sincere.

hellas
hellas
10 years ago

Chafee walked away from the GOP when he realized he and the party were going in opposite directions. If only Caprio had done the same – instead, he still felt entitled to the privileges and perks due a party insider.
Caprio had already broken ranks when he wouldn’t support Roberts, relieving Obama of his obligation to support him. Chafee neither sought nor expected an Obama endorsement.

Warrington Faust
Warrington Faust
10 years ago

I am sure it was calculated. Obama’s “approval rating” is down to 37% (that is a national figure and probably does not hold up in RI). Not many would seek the endiorsement of a prsident who has a 62% “disapproval rating”. Probably figured there was more to gain than lose.
Perhaps kicking Obama while he is down will incline him to get up.

George
George
10 years ago

Chafee did the right thing leaving the GOP. What was wrong was accepting support when the bridge burning was inevitable.

BobN
BobN
10 years ago

And now they have announced that Clinton will campaign for Caprio on Sunday.
This incident is the “shot heard round the world” for the Democrat Party, or their Sarajevo. The war between the Clintonistas and the Obamulans was ignited this week, right here in Rhode Island.

joe bernstein
joe bernstein
10 years ago

Brass- The reason I’m voting for Robitaille is simple-I agree with his position on every major issue and I’m unaware of any ethical concerns surrounding him,unlike Chafee and Caprio.
Block is just an interesting wonk.
Tommy-I don’t think “sammy”is Stuart.Stuart was more literate.Stuart re-appeared on RIF as “sailorman”for awhile and then blew away like chaff.
“Sammy” really adds nothing here.

brassband
brassband
10 years ago

“I agree with his position on every major issue and I’m unaware of any ethical concerns surrounding him,unlike Chafee and Caprio.”
Well, there’s a darn good explanation of your preference!

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