Homeland Security

Things We Read Today, 8

By Justin Katz | September 11, 2012 |

Today: September 11, global change, evolution, economics, 17th amendment, gold standard, and a boughten electorate… all to a purpose.

“Drill”, “Strain”, “Collapse” (No, It’s Not a Greenie’s Nightmare Vision of Offshore Oil Drilling)

By Monique Chartier | December 29, 2011 |

Readers are warned to comment with care; Big Sister is (probably) now watching, attracted to this post by the words included in the title. In America’s brave new world, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has set up fake Twitter and Facebook accounts in order to catch a potential criminal. They claim to be protecting…

Give Some of Those New Airline Safety Regs a Short Half-Life

By Monique Chartier | December 27, 2009 |

The TSA has announced new safety measures, both pre-flight and on-board, in the wake of the attempted on-board bombing of the Amsterdam to Detroit flight. While they apply only to international flights bound for the US, some domestic airlines have also implemented them. ID checks, searches, pat-downs, canine and machine sniffers before the flight? Go…

War criminal claims and our ignorance of history

By Donald B. Hawthorne | May 3, 2009 |

Instapundit does us another public service by highlighting this Pajamas TV commentary about Jon Stewart claiming Truman was a war criminal: Jon Stewart, War Criminals & The True Story of the Atomic Bombs. As one of my friends wrote me after listening to it: “We were moved nearly to tears by this. What has happened…

Head of Homeland Insecurity

By Monique Chartier | April 27, 2009 |

Can we please trade in Janet Napolitano? She has a seriously distorted take on the source and extent of domestic terror threats. (Her eventual apology for the worst of that report does not change the fact that she clearly possesses bad instincts for the job.) She thought the 911 attackers arrived here from Canada. (They…

Review: Your Government Failed You

By Marc Comtois | August 10, 2008 |

Richard Clarke, Your Government Failed You: Breaking the Cycle of National Security Disasters Your government failed you. So said Richard Clarke to the American people during the 9/11 Commission hearings a few years back. Clarke’s resume of over 30 years in the foreign policy arena speaks for itself and adds weight to his point of…

A Profile in Bureaucratic Spending

By Justin Katz | May 27, 2008 |

There’s something emblematic about states’ attempts to tweak homeland security programs in order to apply federal dollars to tangential matters: More openly than at any time since the Sept. 11 attacks, state and local authorities have begun to complain that the federal financing for domestic security is being too closely tied to combating potential terrorist…

Firefighters’ Picket Line Cancelled; Homeland Security Drill to Proceed

By Carroll Andrew Morse | September 28, 2007 |

Projo 7-to-7 is reporting that the Providence firefighters’ union has cancelled the job action that had been threatening to impede Sunday’s Homeland Security disaster drill. Formal announcement to come from union president Paul Doughty at 3:00.

Bob Kerr on the Providence Firefighters’ Union and the Statewide Disaster Drill

By Carroll Andrew Morse | September 28, 2007 |

When you manage to get David Cicilline and Don Carcieri and Bob Kerr and Gio Cicione all aligned against an action you’re taking, it’s time to consider that you might be doing the wrong thing. Bob Kerr says it best in today’s Projo, talking about the Providence Firefighters’ Union plan to use a picket line…

Providence Firefighters’ Union Attempts to Shut Down a Statewide Disaster Drill

By Carroll Andrew Morse | September 27, 2007 |

If this is typical of the attitude that Providence Firefighters’ Union President Paul Doughty brings when he answers a call, then he needs to quit his job and get into a new line of work. From Amanda Milkovits in today’s Projo…A major statewide terrorism drill meant to train firefighters, police officers and medical crews to…

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