In the Heart of the New Revolution

Anchor Rising is well represented at tonight’s fundraiser in East Providence, as are the familiar faces of the RI right-wing, and Republicans, too. About 50 people here.
Warwick Mayor Scott Avedisian had to be elsewhere and spoke first:

State GOP Chairman Gio Cicione went next:

Gio noted that he was glad to finally be able to express gratitude for the presence of people with blue hair:

I caught Gio between speeches and asked his thoughts on the possible primary challenge to Congressional candidate Mark Zaccaria. He said there’d be a primary and was very disciplined about not offering any sort of favoritism.
7:39 p.m.
Speech wave 2 began with Cranston Mayor Alan Fung, whom I last saw at a Northeast Republican Conference cocktail party at which the open bar regrettably had one of my favorite beers… an extra strong brew by Victory. Mayor Fung wasn’t fond of my idea of the Republicans’ forgoing the gubernatorial race.

Mark Zaccaria took the mic next:

And then Congressional Candidate John Loughlin:

8:07 p.m.
East Providence Assistant Mayor Robert Cusack started the third wave, making the point that a few people can really make a difference:

East Providence School Committee Chairman Tony Carcieri is up. Among the first things he said was that he’s not a Republican, but an Independent. The audience wasn’t sure how to react.

Carcieri called out certain state senators and representatives (ahem) to oppose binding arbitration. He says that the unions and their pals in the state house are dragging down the state. “Anybody who’s in allegiance with the unions, throw them out.” He amended: “Throw them all out.”
Tom Clupny, who is running for Betsy Dennigan’s abandoned seat, spoke next, with Cusack sneaking in to suggest that volunteers and money would be helpful, because Mr. Clupny really does have a shot. Refreshing to see somebody who really is clearly in the game because he thinks he can make a difference.

And by way of contrast (of practice, not motivation), Attorney General Candidate Erik Wallin swept in and launched into a well-practiced speech. One new and interesting item was his statement that we shouldn’t have to rely on reporters Tim White and Jim Hummel to investigate corruption.

Back to local with School Committee member Steve Santos, more refreshing enthusiasm at the local level.

8:35 p.m.
Gubernatorial candidate Rory Smith is up. He brought papers up with him, so perhaps he’s prepared this time. His initial point: My mission is to bring jobs back to Rhode Island. Lower taxes. Other high-tax states are economic powerhouses so “they can afford to be a little arrogant with their tax policy.” Fix regulations. Stop the runaway spending. Save the educational system “from the brink of collapse,” with incentive pay, teacher evaluations, leave management of education with administrators.
I think Rory’s been reading Anchor Rising.

Last up, Colleen Conley of the RI Tea Party. Apparently, the group sent three buses down to the Washington protest.

Colleen’s making the case for the GOP to court tea party members. This’ll be a YouTube clip worth watching.
8:45 p.m.
A couple behind the scenes notes: RINO state representative Jack Savage, who had been here, left early, without speaking.
Not to pile on to the Moderate Party, but I’m hearing rumors that it’s losing members because of intransigent kids who won’t compromise in their left-wing social views. Not surprising.

0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
5 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Monique
Editor
11 years ago

“at a Northeast Republican Conference cocktail party at which the open bar regrettably had one of my favorite beers… ”
Hey, at least at this event, no one asked you to repair a leaky ceiling …

mangeek
mangeek
11 years ago

With regards to the last comment about the Moderates… I think the Moderate party is about righting the business climate in the state, not endorsing or excluding any social point of view.
I find it interesting that Left and Right extremes are both attacking the Moderates. You assert that the Moderates are losing traction because they have too many ‘social liberals’, but the left is saying just the opposite ( http://www.rifuture.org/diary/7678/a-modonmod-smackdown ).
My impression is that the Moderates are concerned with the business-end of governance, not the clown-show that makes up the headline news. This should be considered a good thing, I would like to think that Richard Rodi and I could run against each other in a primary, both as moderates, and the public could decide whether they wanted a ‘fiscally-conservative social-conservative’ or a ‘fiscally conservative social-liberal’. Either option is better than our current state of ‘incumbent special-interest shill’ vs. ‘nobody’.
I hate to burst your bubble, but I don’t think the Anchor is realistically going to Rise under the sign of the elephant. This state is a blue-dog wonderland, and is chock-full of far-left leaning young folks. The moderates seem to offer the best chance of breaking the cycle of DINO rule, for both liberals and conservatives.
Work out the social issues in the primaries, good governance is about much more important things, like a balanced budget and a sane business climate.

Will
11 years ago

I think what Justin may be trying to say, is that although the Moderates purport to be, well, moderate, when it comes to things involving social issues, they are anything but. Whether they intend it or not, they make social conservatives feel unwelcome.
Some of those who are among the leadership of that party who are socially liberal are not particularly tolerant of those who are socially more conservative, even if their ideas in regard to economics are nearly identical. If, according to their public statements, people’s opinions on social issues don’t matter at all, then they really shouldn’t.
In addition, the frankly top-down leadership style of that new party is not helping their cause at all. I had some interesting conversations in that regard tonight. I’ll leave it at that.

Will
11 years ago

Thank you to everyone who came out from all over Rhode Island (including people from as far as Westerly!) to tonight’s event in E.P. It was way beyond expectations.
I think what Justin may be trying to say, is that although the Moderates purport to be, well, moderate — when it comes to things involving social issues, they are anything but. They are basically quite liberal. Whether they intend it or not, they make social conservatives feel unwelcome.
Some of those who are among the leadership of that party who are socially liberal are not particularly tolerant of those who are socially more conservative, even if their ideas in regard to economics are nearly identical. If, according to their public statements, people’s opinions on social issues really don’t matter at all, then they really shouldn’t.
In addition, the frankly top-down leadership style of that new party is not helping their cause at all. I had some interesting conversations in that regard tonight. I’ll leave it at that.

bobc
bobc
11 years ago

I too had a conversation with someone who WAS with the Moderate Party and was informed that it had one less member (and candidate). I’ll leave it up to this person to publicly announce this.

Show your support for Anchor Rising with a 25-cent-per-day subscription.