Radically different outcomes in Oxford and Coventry have the same underlying cause.

Perhaps the most terrifying aspect of the school-shooting story in Oxford, Michigan, is that it shouldn’t have happened at all, judging from details provided by Tim Meads in the Daily Wire: The morning of the attack, school administrators met with the boy’s parents and showed them disturbing notes found that day indicating the boy was willing…

Edvard Munch, Anxiety
NPR misses both important points when aligning politics and COVID.

Judging by social media comments, mainstream media types have been thrilled to hear from NPR that people are dying with COVID-19 at a higher rate in Trump-supporting counties across the United States. Of course, substantive analysis would require many more caveats than our social-media-driven culture tends to address.  As the article concedes, the analysis does…

Reporters taking notes
They don’t even know that they are Christians.

In the middle of the Sixteenth Century, St. Francis Xavier wrote to his friend, St. Ignatius of Loyola, of his experience ministering to Christians in India: We have visited the villages of the new converts who accepted the Christian religion a few years ago. No Portuguese live here, the country is so utterly barren and…

Statue of Jesus kneeling
Filippi was right to resist the lure of a relatively open campaign space.

Political observers in Rhode Island shouldn’t be surprised by this announcement from Rhode Island House Minority Leader Blake Filippi: Representing the People of Charlestown, Block Island, South Kingstown and Westerly is the best job, one which I hope to continue in the years ahead. I look forward to helping the Republican nominee for Governor, and…

Blake Filippi's official portrait
It’s time to check in on our willingness to comply.

When I became a vaccine supporter in the spring, my reasoning involved a balance of risks and of tradeoffs.  Over several posts I won’t dig out of the archive right now, I concluded that the risks of the vaccines were extremely low and that they did improve outcomes versus COVID-19, even though the risks posed…

The sun rising or setting
Progressives are never homeless at the State House.

An observer doesn’t have to be cynical to wonder why the Huffington Post published its extensive article warning of the RI Political Co-Op’s division of Ocean State progressives yesterday.  After all, the article was fueled in large part by “a left-wing Rhode Island activist who requested anonymity to protect professional relationships.”  Anonymous sourcing in a case…

Homeless man "seeking human kindness"
Westerly’s teacher training shows how “Culturally Responsive Teaching” smuggles radical racism into the classroom.

In October, the national good-government group Judicial Watch published training documentation from the Westerly, Rhode Island, school department received from a whistleblower.  The training was developed by Rhode Island’s Highlander Institute, which recently transformed from a legitimate educational organization helping students with “learning differences” into one of the state’s leading promoters of the racist ideals…

A white student looks away
Don’t doubt RI is in the national progressive movement’s sights.

An interesting (and long) article appeared in the Huffington Post today, in which Daniel Marans details the friction within Rhode Island’s progressive movement.  The tone is of fair reportage, but a point of view does come through, starting with the implicit critique of the Political Co-op in the headline:  “A Progressive Civil War Threatens the…

A painted target and shadow of the shooter
RI unions have gotten away with implied intimidation for too long.

Here’s an interesting section from William Jacobson’s running notes from the Rhode Island Superior Court hearing in the case of the National Education Association of Rhode Island and Nicole Solas: The court then moved onto that anti-SLAPP portion of the case. Union attorney says Solas didn’t present evidence of bad faith or motive of harassment….

Gavel with a speech bubble
What does a double-timing Providence principal tell us about that job in Rhode Island?

News about former Providence principal Michael Redmond, and the fact that for a period of time he was working full time (during the same hours) for both the school district of Providence and the Washington, D.C., school district (remotely), has been broadly reported in Rhode Island.  Unfortunately, the public debate falls quickly into the lines that divide…

Perseverance sign at E-Cubed Academy
Dr. Skoly appears to be receiving a lesson “to encourage the others” as the saying goes.

When I worked with the RI Center for Freedom & Prosperity, we would periodically get tips from people about problems or corruption in our state, but the tipsters would very rarely volunteer to step forward.  They feared, with good reason, audits, safety reviews, property inspections, and other forms of government harassment.  Silence and toleration has…

Dr. Stephen Skoly's office building
More than half of Rhode Island’s roads are unacceptable.

Writing for Uplift Legal Funding, Leesa Davis took data produced by the Biden administration as part of its infrastructure presentation and compared it with total miles of roadway in each state, creating a rank by the percentage of roads in “acceptable condition.  Take a bow, government of Rhode Island:  once again, you’re number 1 for…

Some keywords are strangely missing from news about increased shootings in Providence.

According to a chart published as part of WPRI’s report on the increase in victims of shootings in Providence, the city has regressed nearly to its 2015 level after steadily falling until 2020.  The number hit a low of 35 in 2019 and then more than doubled in 2020 and has increased from that point…

A man with a bullet mask
Magaziner’s propensity to pander is too dangerous for him ever to be trusted to be governor.

Difficult as it may be to believe, the general treasurer of Rhode Island, Democrat Seth Magaziner, proposes to address the inflation wrought by the policies of Democrat White House occupant, Joe Biden, by — get this — flooding the market with easy cash and imposing price controls. Each of Magaziner’s suggestions can be debated on…

Great Depression bread line
Ripples
Whatever your politics, you simply must be on the lookout for nudges.

Wherever you look to find your bogeymen or whether you support some individual or organization or oppose it, modern society absolutely requires you to keep an eye out for the nudging that Joel Kotkin describes:

Nudging grew out of research into behavioural economics, and was popularised in Cass Sunstein and Richard Thaler’s 2008 book, Nudge. It now has widespread public support and has influenced everything from health warnings for cigarettes to calorie counts for fast food. Yet nudging also has an authoritarian edge, employing techniques and technologies that the Gestapo or NKVD could only dream about to promote the ‘right behaviour’.

Tech firms, both in the US and China, already use messaging nudges to ‘control behaviours’. They use their power to purge their platforms of the wrong messages, as both Facebook and Twitter did when they censored the New York Post’s pre-election story about President Biden’s dissolute son, Hunter.

I’m with Kotkin in thinking the threat is mainly from government and leftist elites, but you can be reasonably certain that anybody who cares about changing opinions in organized ways for good or evil is contemplating studies about brain chemistry and human behavior.  With everything you absorb, be aware.

We’re slipping off the tracks with COVID.

We’ve reached the point that an obvious, relatively mild head cold that peters away over a weekend can keep a child out of school for days.  Testing sites in Rhode Island are saying it can take up to 72 hours to get results from COVID tests.  Pharmacies are a day out for appointments, with who-knows-how-long to get results after that.

All of this, by the way, filters down not only from the requirement to be tested, but also that the test must be the most-sensitive PCR variety.  For the purposes of testing a child with symptoms to see whether COVID is the cause, the at-home tests should be more than adequate.

But we’re being ruled by a self-aggrandized bureaucracy, which doesn’t care about balancing needs and interests.

How much longer are we going to tolerate this?

Omicron is starting to look like a natural vaccine!

At least that’s how some health professionals are seeing it:

Dr. Omar Hamada on Dec. 1 said that the Omicron variant of COVID-19 may provide natural immunity without inducing severe illness, as the symptoms so far resemble more of a “mild, common cold” in South Africa.

In an interview with NTD’s “Capitol Report,” the emergency room doctor and former U.S. Army Special Forces lieutenant colonel said that even though “we’re seeing an uptick in [the] number of people affected, the severity of disease seems to be, at this point, minimal.”

“If the infectivity is greater, but the virulence or severity is less, this may be actually something good in terms of getting people immune to it without necessarily having to depend on a vaccine that’s not incredibly effective,” Hamada stated.

Bizarrely, however, the people in power will refuse to recognize its effects, either because they’ve got plans for their new power or because they’re basically zealots in a cult.

Why is the Western media always selling a story about the evil of the West?

You’ve probably heard the mainstream media claim that we’re facing the Omicron variant (which may represent the merger of COVID with the common cold) because greedy, racist Westerners were refusing to share their vaccines with Africa.  Drew Holden and Aaron Sibarium suggest in the Washington Free Beacon that this analysis is all wrong:

In fact, several African countries have sent back vaccines: The problem they face is one of demand, not supply. Five of the eight countries from which the Biden administration has suspended travel have pumped the brakes on new vaccine shipments, even as cases have increased, because the countries have more doses than health officials can administer.

Across the continent, vaccine hesitancy remains high. A recent survey that spans five West African countries found that 6 in 10 people were vaccine hesitant—compared with 13 percent or less in France, the United Kingdom, and other parts of Europe and 27 percent in the United States.

Mark Tapscott is right to ask why the U.S. and the West are always presented as the bad guy.  Methinks there’s an agenda at play.

How about an “unceded” holy territory?

Well, this is another indication of why the United States should exit the United Nations:

The United Nations approved a resolution targeting Israel and denying Judaism’s link to the Temple Mount in Jerusalem on Wednesday in a 129-11 vote.

The resolution referred to the Temple Mount exclusively by its Muslim name, al-Haram al-Sharif. The text is part of a campaign by the Palestinian Authority, the governing body in charge of autonomous Palestinian regions in Israel, according to The Jerusalem Post.

Next time you hear some progressive talking about “unceded territory,” ask him or her about the Temple Mount.

Material from Hunter Biden’s laptop references Joe Biden’s dimensia?

Sheesh!  As Stephen Green suggests, getting this sort of information out to the public before an election seems like exactly the sort of thing that justify investing power in a news media:

Ablow was close to Hunter and also served as his onetime landlord, the book says. In February 2019, Ablow and Hunter discussed hosting a podcast together, with Hunter texting: “Dad is our first guest.”

Ablow responded: “Does he recall details tho, with the dementia and all.”

Hunter retorted: “Not much these days but since it’s all fake news anyway I don’t see the problem.”

Even now, after Biden is safely installed, the media won’t touch anything like this, despite having spent years promoting the proven hoax of Russian collusion in the Steele dossier.

At this point, McKee and Council 94 are just spitting in our faces to prove they can.

All the mandates.  All the fanatical insistence that naturally acquired immunity, let alone religious or medical scruples, will suffice to avoid vaccination against COVID-19.  And now we read this, regarding the $3,000 vaccine bonuses that Democrat Governor Dan McKee negotiated with government employees in the Council 94 labor union:

Workers can get the bonus without being vaccinated for COVID-19 if they are granted a religious or medical exemption.

They truly are a class set apart living by different standards, and they really don’t care if we know it.  In fact, they very much want us to know it, because there’s nothing we can do about it.

Harvard’s electoral lawfare program is another “believe your lying eyes” moment.

A network of Democrat and progressive legal teams has developed over the past two decades, and last year it arguably succeeded in frauding Joe Biden into the White House.  Now Harvard University is turning on the spicket to create more, as Mark Hemingway reports for RealClearInvestigations:

Reporting the launch of the Election Law Clinic in April, Harvard Law Today said participating students will get course credit for working on political campaigns, as well as “hands-on litigation and advocacy work across a range of election law areas, with an initial focus on redistricting and voter suppression cases. Clinic offerings include federal and state litigation projects, as well as some advocacy opportunities.”

We’re past the time when it was reasonable to see these activities as anything other than a partisan and ideological effort to transform our country.  That doesn’t mean they’re not within their rights, but it should mean we stop treating these institutions as non-partisan and non-ideological players in our society.

Pushback against the assumed privileges of universities is beginning.

Robert Shibley highlights the story of Carl Neuss, whose alma mater, Cornell University, was seeking a donation in the millions from him.  He expressed concern about liberal indoctrination in the college, so the alumni relations folks found a few non-radical professors from among its 1,695 faculty members to talk with the potential donor.  This “best foot forward on free speech” (as Shibley puts it) backfired, because the moderate professors confirmed Neuss’s concerns.

Many institutions of higher education are no longer places of free inquiry and genuine tolerance.  They are, as Neuss feared, indoctrination mills, even if they’ll teach some useful skills along the way.

That is very strongly the impression I’ve been getting from my alma mater, the University of Rhode Island, over the past year, which (let’s just say) reduces my enthusiasm for the school as a graduate and as a parent.

A strange competition between Remdesivir and Ivermectin.

Yes, of course an anecdote is not data, but this story rings the strange tone that’s been heard throughout public debates about COVID-19 and related treatments.

An elderly man on a family visit to the United States from Hong Kong was hospitalized with COVID-19.  The hospital treated him with Remdesivir, and it didn’t work.  The hospital refused to allow the patient to try Ivermectin, so the family went to court and won the right to bring in a doctor willing to administer it.  Then the hospital refused to allow that doctor in because he wasn’t vaccinated, so the family went to court and won again.

He immediately began to recover and was out of the hospital within weeks.

Here are some details about what it’s like to be a 15-week-old unborn child.

HillFaith has compiled a baker’s dozen of facts pertaining to unborn children at 15 weeks of gestation (via Mark Tapscott on Instapundit), such as these:

  • The baby’s body responds to both touch and pain.
    • The baby responds to light touches over most of the body.
    • If something touches the palm of the baby’s hand, the baby will bend his or her fingers as if to grasp the object.
    • Neurotransmitters specific to pain processing appear between 10 and 14 weeks’ gestation. The spinal nerves needed to transmit pain to the thalamus have formed by 15 weeks’ gestation.

In a pluralistic society recognizing a variety of rights and respecting differing religious beliefs, we can debate where different lines can be drawn, how much opinions can differ from one state to the next, and what the best approach to safeguarding life should be, but the truly extreme and totalizing approach of Roe v. Wade is a monstrous travesty.

A biologically male swimmer is dominating the Ivy League female division.

We can probably expect outcomes like that described by Hank Berrien in the Daily Wire to become more and more common:

In November, a University of Pennsylvania swimmer who swam for the men’s team for the previous three years swam for the women’s team, dominating the competition.

Lia Thomas formerly used the name Will Thomas. Swim Swam reported on November 20 that Thomas “blasted the number one 200 free time and the second-fastest 500 free time in the nation on Saturday, breaking Penn program records in both events.” Thomas “swept the 100-200-500 free individual events and contributed to the first-place 400 free relay in a tri-meet against Princeton and Cornell,” the outlet reported.

Pushing the envelope of fantasy over reality, Thomas (pictured here) gushes that “being trans has not affected my ability to do this sport.”  Yeah, no kidding.

This reminds me of the time, in 2003, a pair of young, intelligent, fit, wealthy, white, and well-traveled men won the reality show Amazing Race around the world and tried to make it into a story about how anybody can overcome challenges because they were gay.  How much obviousness are we going to be expected to pretend is not obvious?

Hiring police saves black lives.

That’s the finding of a study by criminologists at several universities:

“Although the total reduction in homicide is roughly equal across Black and white victims, the decline in homicide is twice as large for Black victims in per capita terms,” the team said. Researchers on the project include Professor Benjamin Hansen of the University of Oregon, Emily Weisburst of UCLA and Aaron Chalfin at the University of Pennsylvania.

On average, across the 242 cities studied, one black resident’s life is saved for every 10 to 17 newly hired police officers.

This means, one, defunding the police is a reckless and counterproductive for activists concerned about minorities.  It also means, two, that the total number of police killings of black Americans, whether excusable or inexcusable, is dramatically overbalanced on the positive side of the ledger.

I may have to open another account with Chase.

ecoRI news celebrates activist Brian Wilder for spending his time harassing Chase Bank.  Apparently, by treating energy companies as, you know, real businesses, the bank  is “funding mass extinction and the climate crisis.”  Who knew?

The fossil fuel industry may not give climate advocates a second thought, but it is harder for banks to shake off bad publicity. That is why Wilder, a Cranston resident, and fellow activists, such as Elizabeth O’Connell of Warren and Diane Hill of North Kingstown, often appear outside pro-petroleum banks or visit their branch lobbies — to let these institutions know their investment choices are helping to endanger the environment and public health.

The wasted human energy, here, is staggering, but it pales in comparison with the harm that would be done if these protests were more successful, from the civic principle that seeks to deprive people of the ability to conduct business to the terrible cost for American families of skyrocketing energy bills.

Fining the contractor for Providence’s Small Business Saturday street closure seems like a cover-up.

This is just a little too neat and tidy a resolution to the story of government incompetence in Providence mentioned in this space yesterday:

The construction company responsible for the closure of a Providence street lined with small businesses during one of the busiest shopping days of the year has been fined for working without a permit.

It’d be interesting to trace the history.  I could see the city generally letting permits slip, except where it becomes a political liability.

Did somebody take over Cicilline’s Twitter, or is polling data scaring Democrats?

John DePetro caught a curious tweet from Rhode Island’s radical Congressman, Democrat David Cicilline:

These smash and grab retail crimes are outrageous! Retailers & small biz have suffered enough from pandemic. Shoppers shouldn’t be terrorized by these criminals. Thx. to police for all they’re doing!

John notes the contrast with Cicilline’s usual rhetoric and speculates:

Perhaps this could be a sign just how nervous democrats are about 2022 and how the Progressive tone of the party is causing panic. There is rumor a Progressive female candidate may challenge Cicilline in a Democrat primary.

I’m not sure Cicilline would react to a progressive primary challenger by moving to the political right, but his party has gone so far left that any moderation at all feels almost like a party switch.

Is Omicron an escape hatch for Biden’s disastrous policies?

I’m not ready to endorse Sundance’s theory on The Conservative Treehouse, but it provides an interesting perspective by which to judge events going forward:

The near horizon looks pretty clear. Gasoline will keep rising fast and will cost $6 to $7/gal before next spring. There is no way under current Joe Biden policy to avoid this, unless he was to completely abandon his energy policy; that’s not likely. The climate change ideologues, academics and far-left communists behind the Biden policy are not likely to see the catastrophic economic damage as a bad thing, instead they will likely say it’s the new normal.

With that level of supply side economic chaos seemingly unavoidable, the only way for Biden to try and mitigate political damage is an attempt to halt the demand side. That’s why the administration needs Omicron.

Under this theory, fear-mongering over new variants of COVID acts almost like raising interest rates to cool the economy, only powerful special interests would be the first hurt by that means (ah, trickle-down), whereas keeping people home and not spending hurts the powerless masses, first.

Here’s the detail that shows how badly Providence government is managed.

Businesses on Hope Street in Providence were all prepared for one of their biggest days for sales: small business Saturday.  Oops:

Providence Water crews closed a portion of the street early Saturday morning and part of the afternoon for utility work. The construction has been happening for some time, but business owners, like Asher Schofield of Frog & Toad, thought the work would be paused on such an important day.

In fact, earlier in the week, Democrat Mayor Jorge Elorza was promoting free on-street parking for the area on that day.

How does the city not have a central location or process to ensure that these conflicts don’t happen?

And of course, it’s (unionized) government, so the clients (i.e., people who live and work in the city) can’t just note the problem and send the workers packing.  Whoever makes a mistake, the consequence is never borne by the organization that collects our money to “serve” the rest of us.

A two-tiered double-standard this obvious is a dangerous thing for democracy.

The so-called QAnon Shaman was particularly unfortunate to have the best outfit among those who pressed into the U.S. Capitol on January 6 and has been sentenced to jail for about three-and-a-half years.  Contrast his case, as Jonathan Turley does, with the story of a smirking Antifa thug who attacked a congressman’s office with an ax:

The self-avowed Antifa member took an axe to the office of Sen. John Hoeven’s in Fargo on Dec. 21, 2020. Federal sentencing guidelines suggested 10–16 months in prison but he was only sentenced to probation and fined $2,784 for restitution . . . he then reportedly mocked the FBI for returning his axe. Others declared him a hero and Democratic politicians pitched in for his legal defense.

The situation that our government is setting up is one in which the political right will be less inclined to protest while the political left feels increasingly bold in its destruction and violence.  It’s pretty hard to come to any conclusion other than that this is what Democrats want.

OK, I’m convinced; I’ll avoid Heaven Hill’s brands.

Upon discovering that it’s permissible to sip hard liquor, I’ve been getting into whiskey in the past year.  From that perspective, I find this approach from Heaven Hill distillery simply bizarre:

To celebrate what they view as a just outcome, some whiskey lovers began purchasing bottles of “Rittenhouse Rye.” The brand name is derived not from the recent court case but from Rittenhouse Square in Philadelphia, an open-space park designed by William Penn and named for an early 19th-century papermaker. …

Heaven Hill evidently wasn’t happy about the free advertising, tweeting, “We have been disheartened to learn that some individuals and businesses have been using our Rittenhouse Straight Rye Whiskey brand to celebrate the Kyle Rittenhouse case verdict, despite the profound loss of life from those events.”

Presumably, the company has a better sense of who buys its products than I do, but these declarations about who should buy their products and for what personal purposes used to be limited to self-righteous musicians.  We should return to that state of affairs.

What’s up with foreign-born billionaires reshaping U.S. politics?

Daniel Greenfield’s look into three billionaires funding the Democrat dark money machine is worth a read:

Politico recently reported that the Sixteen Thirty Fund, the leading dark money machine of the Left, had pumped $410 million into Dem 2020 efforts to defeat Trump and Republicans.

The Sixteen Thirty Fund had raised a record $390 million that year and half the money came from just 4 donors. While the names of the donors are secret, the article did note the names of three major known STF backers: Pierre Omidyar, Hansjörg Wyss, and George Soros.

Funny how the involvement of billionaires is only lamented by RI’s elected officials when they help the other side.

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Felix Vallotton, Box Seats at the Theater

Trinity Rep Falls Back on the Woke Grift to Bully Reviewer

Trinity Rep’s open letter in response to a mostly positive review of A Christmas Carol in the Providence Journal isn’t just thinned skinned; it’s chillingly fascist.


A sonogram.

Social Media Brings Forth the Most Disturbing Pro-Abortion Argument

Categorically denying a mother’s responsibility to her children means the utter destruction of human society at its very core.

Casual office planning meeting

Politics This Week with John DePetro: PR Bumbling All Around

John and Justin discuss local, state, and national stories with which the messaging is going all wrong.

Paul Kane painting of a native American encampment

The URI President’s Questionable Claims About Farming and “Unceded Territory”

URI’s newly imported president is casually asserting priorities and history that may undermine his own institution and disrupt Rhode Islanders’ ability to determine their own destiny.

The Aristocats on State of the State

State of the State: Aristocats, Reconfigured

After two years of not performing music due to the Covid-19 pandemic and the death of band member Nat Piccirilli, the Aristocats have regrouped and reconfigured.

A sonogram.

Social Media Brings Forth the Most Disturbing Pro-Abortion Argument

Categorically denying a mother’s responsibility to her children means the utter destruction of human society at its very core.

Casual office planning meeting

Politics This Week with John DePetro: PR Bumbling All Around

John and Justin discuss local, state, and national stories with which the messaging is going all wrong.

Paul Kane painting of a native American encampment

The URI President’s Questionable Claims About Farming and “Unceded Territory”

URI’s newly imported president is casually asserting priorities and history that may undermine his own institution and disrupt Rhode Islanders’ ability to determine their own destiny.

The Aristocats on State of the State

State of the State: Aristocats, Reconfigured

After two years of not performing music due to the Covid-19 pandemic and the death of band member Nat Piccirilli, the Aristocats have regrouped and reconfigured.

Norman Rockwell Freedom from Want

An Object for Our Thanksgiving Gratitude

When we remove the sacred from our traditions and sacralize our ordinary traditions, our gratitude can become a target, with nobody authorized to offer forgiveness.

A man with a mirror mask

Politics This Week with John DePetro: A Revealing Week

John and Justin cover lots of ground in this content-rich discussion of political news in the Ocean State.

Ripples
Whatever your politics, you simply must be on the lookout for nudges.

Wherever you look to find your bogeymen or whether you support some individual or organization or oppose it, modern society absolutely requires you to keep an eye out for the nudging that Joel Kotkin describes:

Nudging grew out of research into behavioural economics, and was popularised in Cass Sunstein and Richard Thaler’s 2008 book, Nudge. It now has widespread public support and has influenced everything from health warnings for cigarettes to calorie counts for fast food. Yet nudging also has an authoritarian edge, employing techniques and technologies that the Gestapo or NKVD could only dream about to promote the ‘right behaviour’.

Tech firms, both in the US and China, already use messaging nudges to ‘control behaviours’. They use their power to purge their platforms of the wrong messages, as both Facebook and Twitter did when they censored the New York Post’s pre-election story about President Biden’s dissolute son, Hunter.

I’m with Kotkin in thinking the threat is mainly from government and leftist elites, but you can be reasonably certain that anybody who cares about changing opinions in organized ways for good or evil is contemplating studies about brain chemistry and human behavior.  With everything you absorb, be aware.

We’re slipping off the tracks with COVID.

We’ve reached the point that an obvious, relatively mild head cold that peters away over a weekend can keep a child out of school for days.  Testing sites in Rhode Island are saying it can take up to 72 hours to get results from COVID tests.  Pharmacies are a day out for appointments, with who-knows-how-long to get results after that.

All of this, by the way, filters down not only from the requirement to be tested, but also that the test must be the most-sensitive PCR variety.  For the purposes of testing a child with symptoms to see whether COVID is the cause, the at-home tests should be more than adequate.

But we’re being ruled by a self-aggrandized bureaucracy, which doesn’t care about balancing needs and interests.

How much longer are we going to tolerate this?

Omicron is starting to look like a natural vaccine!

At least that’s how some health professionals are seeing it:

Dr. Omar Hamada on Dec. 1 said that the Omicron variant of COVID-19 may provide natural immunity without inducing severe illness, as the symptoms so far resemble more of a “mild, common cold” in South Africa.

In an interview with NTD’s “Capitol Report,” the emergency room doctor and former U.S. Army Special Forces lieutenant colonel said that even though “we’re seeing an uptick in [the] number of people affected, the severity of disease seems to be, at this point, minimal.”

“If the infectivity is greater, but the virulence or severity is less, this may be actually something good in terms of getting people immune to it without necessarily having to depend on a vaccine that’s not incredibly effective,” Hamada stated.

Bizarrely, however, the people in power will refuse to recognize its effects, either because they’ve got plans for their new power or because they’re basically zealots in a cult.

Why is the Western media always selling a story about the evil of the West?

You’ve probably heard the mainstream media claim that we’re facing the Omicron variant (which may represent the merger of COVID with the common cold) because greedy, racist Westerners were refusing to share their vaccines with Africa.  Drew Holden and Aaron Sibarium suggest in the Washington Free Beacon that this analysis is all wrong:

In fact, several African countries have sent back vaccines: The problem they face is one of demand, not supply. Five of the eight countries from which the Biden administration has suspended travel have pumped the brakes on new vaccine shipments, even as cases have increased, because the countries have more doses than health officials can administer.

Across the continent, vaccine hesitancy remains high. A recent survey that spans five West African countries found that 6 in 10 people were vaccine hesitant—compared with 13 percent or less in France, the United Kingdom, and other parts of Europe and 27 percent in the United States.

Mark Tapscott is right to ask why the U.S. and the West are always presented as the bad guy.  Methinks there’s an agenda at play.

How about an “unceded” holy territory?

Well, this is another indication of why the United States should exit the United Nations:

The United Nations approved a resolution targeting Israel and denying Judaism’s link to the Temple Mount in Jerusalem on Wednesday in a 129-11 vote.

The resolution referred to the Temple Mount exclusively by its Muslim name, al-Haram al-Sharif. The text is part of a campaign by the Palestinian Authority, the governing body in charge of autonomous Palestinian regions in Israel, according to The Jerusalem Post.

Next time you hear some progressive talking about “unceded territory,” ask him or her about the Temple Mount.

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